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A simple transition effect with Clutter

When doing something with graphics, your first need an idea (granted, as with pretty much everything else). In this case, a simple transition that I've seen somewhere a long time ago and I wanted to reproduce with Clutter.


The code is available in a branch of a media explorer I'm currently working on. A few bullet points to follow the code:
  • As the effect needs a "screenshot" of a Clutter scene to play with. You first need to create a subclass of ClutterOffscreenEffect as it does the work of redirecting the painting of a subtree of actors in an offscreen buffer that you can  reuse to texture the rectangles you'll be animating in the effect. This subclass has a "progress" property to control the animation.
  • Then actually compute the coordinates of the grid cells both in screen space and in texture space. To be able to use cogl_rectangles_with_texture_coords(), to try limit the number of GL calls (and/or by the Cogl journal and to ease the animation of the cells fading out, I decided to store the diagonals of the rectangle in a 1D array so that the following grid:


    is stored as the following array:
  • ::paint_target()looks at the "progress" property, animate those grid cells accordingly and draw them. priv->rects is the array storing the initial rectangles, priv->animated_rects the animated ones and priv->chunks stores the start and duration of each diagonal animation along with a (index, length) tuple that references the diagonal rectangles in priv->rects and priv->animated_rects.
Some more details:
  • in the ::paint_target() function, you can special case when the progress is 0.0 (paint the whole FBO instead of the textured grid) and 1.0 (don't do anything),
  • Clutter does not currently allow to just rerun the effect when you animate a property of an offscreen effect for instance. This means that when animating the "progress" property on the effect, it queues a redraw on the actor that end up in the offscreen to trigger the effect ::paint_target() again. A branch from Neil allows to queue a "rerun" on the effect to avoid having to do that,
  • The code has some limitations right now (ie, n_colums must be equal to n_rows) but easily fixable. Once done, it makes sense to try to push the effect to Mx.

Comments

  1. This is very cool! Now you just need to make it rotate the tiles and flip between two actors like in Portal 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPthzbly8FQ :) It looks like that alternates between different directions as well. Maybe a property to say which direction the tiles should head it would be good? If only Clutter had a sound library for the clacking effect..

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